Important:

The Humanities department think it is important to respond to unfolding events and current affairs, and help students to place difficult situations in their historical and geographical context. To help students to understand the events in the Ukraine, we will be spending a lesson this week going through the below Powerpoint and allowing students time to discuss and ask questions. The aim is to allow students to air worries and questions, answer them factually and honestly, and to challenge some of the false narratives that are being shared on social media such as TikTok. 

Ukraine Lesson – Web Version

 

‘The past creates the present. It is utterly impossible to understand or navigate the world unless you understand history…’

Click here for History curriculum outline

Why do we study History?

The History curriculum is intended to enrich students’ understanding of the world around them by  broadening their understanding of how modern cultures and ways of life are inspired by events and ways of life that have been seen in the past. The curriculum has been designed to incorporate a range of skills and knowledge that will support students in their development as young historians, but will also run alongside other subjects in their development of understanding the world around them and to prepare them for life beyond school as citizens in the local community. The schemes of work have been planned with the intention of giving students both a chronological and thematic insight into different cultures, societies, ways of ruling, conflicts and protest, which all led to changes which have inspired our society and the world today. Above all is the desire to equip students with the knowledge and emotional understanding to make sense of the complex world in which they live. 

In History, students are taught using a range of resources and take part in a wide range of activities. Students explore the subject through group work, independent investigation, use of historical primary and secondary sources, and considering a range of historian interpretations to support their learning. Students use and develop a range of skills such as how to pull apart historical evidence and interpretations, how to gain understanding from the use of primary sources, and how to write in a historical way with evidence to support their ideas. To support their studies, students are offered the opportunity to visit many places linked to their current topics. All GCSE students get an opportunity to visit Berlin, Poland, or WW1 battlefields during their time at Studley High School, with KS3 students visiting a range of museums and visitor centres, taking part in workshops led by visitors, and listening to real life accounts from people who have experienced events such as the Holocaust, Windrush and the Kindertransport programme.  Student progress is facilitated through them studying a well-planned and exciting curriculum, and is measured through both formative and summative assessments with a formal assessment taking place for each topic that we teach. This allows for regular and meaningful teacher feedback to support the pupils’ ongoing development of historical understanding and skills. Individual student progress is continually assessed through teacher questioning and observation in the classroom.

History programme of study at Key Stage 3 (Years 7-9)

Our Key Stage 3 programme of study is designed to encourage learners to be inspired, moved and changed by following a broad, coherent and worthwhile course of study. Each year group will cover the following key questions:

Year 7

  • How far did Britain change following the Roman invasion?
  • ‘Castles and the conquered’. What impact did the Norman invasion have on England?
  • How accurately are the Middle Ages represented?
  • How far were the Tudor Monarchs responsible for turmoil in the 16th century?
  • How revolutionary were the revolutions?
  • How ‘great’ is Great Britain?

Year 8

  • How ‘united’ is the United Kingdom?
  • Was the ‘Great War’ worth winning?
  • Why did post-war Europe give way to the deadly dictator?
  • How should the Holocaust be remembered?
  • Was Churchill the ‘saviour’ of WW2?
  • How much social change took place in the 20th century?

During Year 9, the structure of the units is slightly different to that which is followed in Years 7 and 8.  Year 9 history explores the key events of the 2nd half-term of the twentieth century and is designed to help students understand the political, economic and social landscape that exists today.

History programme of study at Key Stage 4 (Years 10-11)

We follow the Edexcel specification, in which students complete modules on the following topics:

  • Medicine Through Time 1250-present
  • Early Elizabethan England 1558-1588
  • Weimar & Nazi Germany 1918-1939
  • Superpower relations and the Cold War 1941-1991

Homework expectations

Homework is an important aspect of the History curriculum.  Not only does it offer the opportunity for students to consolidate their learning within lessons, it also offers a chance for them to enhance their understanding of key topics and fundamental skills outside of the classroom.  At Key Stage 3, students are expected to complete one extended piece of homework per week and spend between 20-30 minutes on this piece.   At Key Stage 4, students are expected to complete one piece of homework a week, with at least 30 minutes spent completing each piece.

How can parents and guardians support at home?

There are a range of ways in which parents and guardians can help to support their child with developing their History knowledge and historical skills. This can simply be taking an interest in topics studied and explored or supporting with homework tasks. The local area is full of historical links so any trips out would also extend their learning!

Parents also have an important role in helping support with revision. Teachers will incorporate effective revision strategies into their teaching, particularly at KS4, but we are always grateful for the support offered at home to reinforce techniques.  

Extra-curricular opportunities

To support their studies, students are offered the opportunity to visit many places linked to their current topics. All GCSE students get an opportunity to visit Berlin, Poland, or WW1 battlefields during their time at Studley High School, with KS3 students visiting a range of museums and visitor centres, taking part in workshops led by visitors, and listening to real life accounts from people who have experienced events such as the Holocaust, Windrush and the Kindertransport programme.